4:42 pm - Thursday January 19, 3397

Breaking News: Nigerian varsity lecturer, Dr. GIDEON IDOWU wins $150,000 (2.3 million Rand) Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer Grant in South Africa…Alumnus of Federal University of Technology Akure defeats 292 candidates representing 26 countries in 2021 competition *Winning research explores how, through poorly enforced environmental laws in Africa contributes significantly to global marine plastic pollution, contamination of its freshwater bodies, where rural populations depend for drinking water *Grant established in memory of the late Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer’s lifelong vision of seeing research at the forefront of developing solutions for conserving, and better understanding of our environment for generations to come *“ Dr. Gideon Idowu will lead a group of scientists from 11 African countries looking to gain deep understanding of the impacts of microplastic pollution on human health; loss of aquatic biodiversity, helping inform policy and attitudinal changes across the African continent for generations to come”-Bridget Fury, head of Oppenheimer Generations Philanthropies and chair of the JWO Grant expert pane *BY FREDRICK IMAGBEAGBON/EDUCATION Correspondent, Johannesburg

Breaking News:

Nigerian varsity lecturer, Dr. GIDEON IDOWU wins $150,000 (2.3 million Rand) Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer Grant in South Africa…Alumnus of Federal University of Technology Akure defeats 292 candidates representing 26 countries in 2021 competition

*Winning research explores how, through poorly enforced environmental laws in Africa contributes significantly to global marine plastic pollution, contamination of its freshwater bodies, where rural populations depend for drinking water

*Grant established in memory of the late Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer’s lifelong vision of seeing research at the forefront of developing solutions for conserving, and better understanding of our environment for generations to come

*“ Dr. Gideon Idowu will lead a group of scientists from 11 African countries looking to gain deep understanding of the impacts of microplastic pollution on human health; loss of aquatic biodiversity,  helping inform policy and attitudinal changes across the African continent for generations to come”-Bridget Fury, head of Oppenheimer Generations Philanthropies and chair of the JWO Grant expert pane

*BY FREDRICK IMAGBEAGBON/EDUCATION Correspondent, Johannesburg 

THIS UNASSUMING NIGERIAN ACADEMIC, DR. GIDEON IDOWU, a highly respected lecturer at Federal University of Technology, Akure emerged first Nigerian, third recipient of the Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer research grant of US$150,000 (approximately R2.3 million) – all thanks to his distinguished research on the significant health impact of marine microplastics on people and the environment, which proved to have a wider social impact outside science academia in Africa. 

This correspondent gathered that after a continent-wide search spanning 27 African countries and 292 participants, Federal University of Technology Akure (FUTA) lecturer Dr Gideon Idowu emerged as the third recipient of the annual Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer (JWO) research grant of US$150,000 (R2 290 327).  

The highly anticipated 2021 grant was handed over during an interactive ceremony in Johannesburg attended by local media, as well as representatives from the Oppenheimer Generations Philanthropies and Oppenheimer Generations Research and Conservation.

 

The grant was established three years ago, as inspired by the late Jennifer Ward Oppenheimer’s lifelong vision of seeing research at the forefront of developing solutions for conserving, enhancing and bettering understanding of our environment for generations to come. It essentially encourages practical action to implement innovative solutions at local, regional, and national scale for the benefit of African communities.

Idowu’s research explores how, through poorly enforced environmental laws, Africa contributes significantly to global marine plastic pollution, as well as the contamination of its own freshwater bodies, upon which many rural populations depend for drinking water.

The impacts of plastic pollution are huge, as such the research exposes animals and humans to microplastics and plastic-derived endocrine-disrupting chemicals which can affect reproductive systems and metabolism.

Consequently, Idowu will lead a group of scientists from 11 African countries looking to gain the understanding of the impacts of microplastic pollution on human health and the loss of aquatic biodiversity, ultimately helping inform policy and attitudinal changes across the African continent for generations to come.

“We are excited about Dr. Idowu’s research and look forward to supporting him throughout the duration of the grant. This is an annual award, and we endeavor to continue to look for leading scientists who are solving the continent’s most challenging problems,” said Bridget Fury, head of Oppenheimer Generations Philanthropies and chair of the JWO Grant expert panel.

CERTAINLY, Good journalism costs a lot of money. Without doubt, only good journalism can ensure the possibility of a good society, an accountable democracy, and a transparent government. We are ready to hold every corrupt government accountable to the citizens. To continually enjoy free access to the best investigative journalism in Nigeria, we are requesting of you to consider making a modest support to this noble endeavor.

By contributing to NAIJA STANDARD NEWSPAPER, you are helping to sustain a journalism of relevance and ensuring it remains free and available to all without fear or favor.

Your donation is voluntary — please decide how much and how often you want to give. For offline donation, email: letters@nigeriastandardnewspaper.com or call +2348037128048 (Nigeria) or +16825834890 (United States of America)

[pff-paystack id=

 

Filed in: Africa

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply